The Santa Fe Cowboy

My favorite thing about bicycling across America is meeting folks like Archie West. My son, Quincy, pointed him out as we pedaled toward Santa Fe. Mr. West was repairing a part of a fence along the edge of his ranch. Carrying a coil of barbed-wire, he moved down the line, looking for breaks. Watching him, I sensed he was more than just an old cowboy. The way he moved, the way he took off his tan hat and wiped his brow, the way he worked with his hands – told me he’d been with this land his entire life.

I rolled up on my loaded bicycle, almost as if I was on my own horse and introduced myself. Soon, Archie was leaning on a fence post that was as old and weathered as he was – with the grace and pose of a Hollywood cowboy – his elbow at an angle on the post, his hip in the opposite direction, his thumb in his jean pocket – telling me the history of his family, his land, and how his dad had settled here from Oklahoma just before the Dust Bowl era. “This land is too dry to plant any crops. The only thing you can raise here is cattle.”

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A black-and-blue thunderstorm circled behind us, unsettling the high desert with strong gusts. Mr. West dug into the dry earth with the side of his cowboy boot and pushed it aside, telling us about the big rain that had hit last night. “It’s never enough,” he said. “I hope we get more.”

I told Archie about our bicycle trip up Route 66. His brow lifted. He adjusted his pose and asked many of the usual questions people ask about our trip. I told him about starting in Santa Monica and about how many miles we tried to do in a day. Then I told him, “The best part about doing this bike trip is doing it with my son,”

Archie understood the deeper meaning of what I was saying, smiled and shot back, “My son moved back on the ranch. I love working with my boy.”

Soon it would be getting dark. Quincy and I waved good-bye and rolled down the windy road, pedaling side-by-side. The dark clouds moved along the distant mountains. I turned to my boy and reminded him, “son, you could take all of the University classes you can find and you’ll never have the conversation we just experienced.”